The virtues of anger

By Shay | March 23, 2019 | 0 Comments

Anti-racism work is tiring. Unlike other jobs (whether it’s truly your day job like with me or virtually a job like for those who dedicate their off time to it), where time off is important to one’s overall sense of well being, it doesn’t necessarily work the same. Doing anti-racism work as a Black woman … Read more

The college admission scandal is just one blossom from a deeper set of roots

By Veronica Perez | March 17, 2019 | 1 Comment

(Following up on the recent post here at BGIM Media, a piece by one of our contributors on the pervasive inequities throughout the educational system that hold people back, often because of race) So I’m sure y’all have heard by now about this college admissions bribery/scandal/mess with this white dude, William Singer, the two white … Read more

Making the grade or paying for it: Meritocracy is a lie; so are quotas

By Shay | March 14, 2019 | 1 Comment

So, let’s talk a bit about the college admission testing scam, bribery, fraud story that involves dozens of parents with enough money to try to buy their kids’ way into college but somehow not enough to educate and raise them well enough to make it into college on their own. This is the part where, … Read more

Maybe we could start telling the stories right?

By Samuel James | March 11, 2019 | 0 Comments

It’s almost been a year since Linda Brown’s death and so I’ve been thinking a lot about segregation. It still exists, of course, in very real ways, but it’s just not on the books in the same form anymore. Unfortunately, so much of this is because, as a population we’re still mentally segregated. This can … Read more

After the turning point, Part 1

By Heather Denkmire | March 8, 2019

Losing a friend because I was steeped in white supremacy (and didn’t even see it) was the beginning of my turning point in racial justice work; she showed me that my “writing for white people” in a newspaper, however good my intentions were, had the impact of harming people of color. Without realizing it, I … Read more

Understanding that you, too, are racist (even if you’re one of the “good ones”)

By Shay | March 5, 2019

Within the past 24 hours, I have had several exchanges that brought me back down to Earth and reminded me that for many self-professed white allies, their knowledge of racism is still rather rudimentary. It’s more of a head exercise that hasn’t quite gravitated downward to the heart and shaken them to their core. As … Read more

How can you trust the system when the system put him there?

By Samuel James | March 4, 2019

I love Elijah Cummings. His “Come on!” at the end of the Michael Cohen hearing is my new ringtone. I agree with him a lot, but we differ is when he says, “We’re better than this!” If he’s talking about the country, I don’t think we are. I look at all those republican reps during … Read more

All the news that should have been…other than Jussie

By Samuel James | February 25, 2019

Jussie. Yikes. As of this writing Jussie Smollett has been charged with a felony count of disorderly conduct for filing a false police report. It doesn’t look good for him, but just for a moment I invite you to take into account what else has been happening. Back in the 1990s there was this dude … Read more

The site, the work and life: Keeping it going

By Shay | February 21, 2019

This year, this site celebrates its 11th birthday. Given the ever-changing world, 11 years of blogging is a milestone. Over the years, I have seen bloggers become household names and others fade away into obscurity. Blogging has come a long way, and it’s been one strange ride!   Yet the one that thing that has … Read more

Being Black in a white state: Why I “stick it out”

By Shay | February 20, 2019

This story ran in Maine’s largest paper this past Sunday and it reminded of a question that I was recently asked by a Black woman from the south. What is it like to be a Black person in such a white state? To be frank, I have received some version of this question pretty regularly … Read more

The virtues of anger

By Shay | March 23, 2019 | 0 Comments

Anti-racism work is tiring. Unlike other jobs (whether it’s truly your day job like with me or virtually a job like for those who dedicate their off time to it), where time off is important to one’s overall sense of well being, it doesn’t necessarily work the same. Doing anti-racism work as a Black woman in Trump’s America means that even time off can be a loaded issue. After all, racism, whether personal or systemic doesn’t operate on my time clock nor does it take a break. I have had racism find me on vacation, when shopping, when eating, when caring for an ailing family member…oh yeah, any activity that I engage in can be interrupted by white supremacy and racism. It’s just an uncomfortable truth and it has always been an uncomfortable truth. As a result, I believe in blowing off steam by any means necessary. When I learned that letting things out was vital to my well-being, my anxiety decreased and my blood pressure thanked me. My usual venue for blowing off steam...

Read More

The virtues of anger

By Shay | March 23, 2019 | 0 Comments

Anti-racism work is tiring. Unlike other jobs (whether it’s truly your day job like with me or virtually a job like for those who dedicate their off time to it), where time off is important to one’s overall sense of well being, it doesn’t necessarily work the same. Doing anti-racism work as a Black woman in Trump’s America means that even time off can be a loaded issue. After all, racism, whether personal or systemic doesn’t operate on my time clock nor does it take a break. I have had racism find me on vacation, when shopping, when eating, when caring for an ailing family member…oh yeah, any activity that I engage in can be interrupted by white supremacy and racism. It’s just an uncomfortable truth and it has always been an uncomfortable truth. As a result, I believe in blowing off steam by any means necessary. When I learned that letting things out was vital to my well-being, my anxiety decreased and my blood pressure thanked me. My usual venue for blowing off steam … Read more

Making the grade or paying for it: Meritocracy is a lie; so are quotas

By Shay | March 14, 2019

So, let’s talk a bit about the college admission testing scam, bribery, fraud story that involves dozens of parents with enough money to try to buy their kids’ way into college but somehow not enough to educate and raise them well enough to make it into college on their own. This is the part where, … Read more

How can you trust the system when the system put him there?

By Samuel James | March 4, 2019

I love Elijah Cummings. His “Come on!” at the end of the Michael Cohen hearing is my new ringtone. I agree with him a lot, but we differ is when he says, “We’re better than this!” If he’s talking about the country, I don’t think we are. I look at all those republican reps during … Read more

All the news that should have been…other than Jussie

By Samuel James | February 25, 2019

Jussie. Yikes. As of this writing Jussie Smollett has been charged with a felony count of disorderly conduct for filing a false police report. It doesn’t look good for him, but just for a moment I invite you to take into account what else has been happening. Back in the 1990s there was this dude … Read more

The college admission scandal is just one blossom from a deeper set of roots

By Veronica Perez | March 17, 2019

(Following up on the recent post here at BGIM Media, a piece by one of our contributors on the pervasive inequities throughout the educational system that hold people back, often because of race) So I’m sure y’all have heard by now about this college admissions bribery/scandal/mess with this white dude, William Singer, the two white … Read more

Maybe we could start telling the stories right?

By Samuel James | March 11, 2019

It’s almost been a year since Linda Brown’s death and so I’ve been thinking a lot about segregation. It still exists, of course, in very real ways, but it’s just not on the books in the same form anymore. Unfortunately, so much of this is because, as a population we’re still mentally segregated. This can … Read more

After the turning point, Part 1

By Heather Denkmire | March 8, 2019

Losing a friend because I was steeped in white supremacy (and didn’t even see it) was the beginning of my turning point in racial justice work; she showed me that my “writing for white people” in a newspaper, however good my intentions were, had the impact of harming people of color. Without realizing it, I … Read more

Being Black in a white state: Why I “stick it out”

By Shay | February 20, 2019

This story ran in Maine’s largest paper this past Sunday and it reminded of a question that I was recently asked by a Black woman from the south. What is it like to be a Black person in such a white state? To be frank, I have received some version of this question pretty regularly … Read more

My racism turning point

By Heather Denkmire | February 17, 2019

It required a lot of emotional pain for me to begin understand how, as Rev. angel Kyodo williams says, “love and justice are not two. without inner change, there can be no outer change; without collective change, no change matters.” For a few decades, I haven’t been entirely clueless about racism. From the 1990s to … Read more

Meeting with a governor and aiming for real progress

By Shay | December 16, 2018

For the past eight years, Maine has been the laughingstock of the nation with our outgoing governor, Paul LePage. A man who was essentially the starter Trump, LePage was the ghost of America’s future  with his openly racist remarks that included telling the Maine NAACP they could kiss his butt. This after being questioned on … Read more

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