#MeToo: The erasure and fetishization of the Black body

By LaLa Drew | October 17, 2017 | 0 Comments

Sunday morning when I logged online, a fluttering ping of status updates rolled into a steady flow of trauma to my feed. Ping “Me too.” Ping “Me too.” Ping “Me too.” Often accompanied with the words: “If all the women who have been sexually harassed and/or sexually assaulted wrote ‘Me too.’ as their status, we … Read more

Touching my hair and stealing my humanity, or How white supremacy robs us all

By blackgirlinmaine | October 13, 2017 | 41 Comments

Given the current state of race relations, the story that I am about to tell is seemingly small. After all, America is currently being governed by an openly white supremacist madman who lacks compassion and empathy for anyone who falls outside of his base. We are in the midst of a dumpster fire called America … Read more

Of a crumbling house and bended knees

By Samuel James | October 9, 2017

Today’s post comes by way of Samuel James, a writer, speaker and roots musician. He wields a voice of grit and gravel and is a modern guitar master; his songwriting has been compared to Leonard Cohen’s and his guitar virtuosity to that of Jimi Hendrix. In addition to bringing his music to the stage, he … Read more

The same key to solve mass violence and systemic racism

By blackgirlinmaine | October 4, 2017 | 2 Comments

In these moments, words are meaningless. Here we stand at the moral crossroad as a nation, deeply fractured and in tatters. We are a nation under siege but the enemy is not from outside; it is the enemy within. This enemy has always been with us but until this moment, the vast majority of Americans … Read more

Radical tenderness

By Veronica Perez | September 28, 2017 | 0 Comments

Today’s post is from contributor Veronica A. Perez (b. 1983). She is an artist and educator who works mostly in the mediums of sculpture and photography. Usually utilizing construction and kitschy materials in her pieces, Perez creates intense personal moments by means of hybridization, ideals of beauty, nostalgia, while fragility echoes sentiments of a lost … Read more

We are not the problem

By Samara Cole Doyon | September 25, 2017 | 0 Comments

Today’s post is written by Samara Doyon. Samara has been a Black girl living in Maine for the past 30+ years (read: her entire life). She is a writer, educator, wife, and mother. Despite the roots of her family tree, half of which reach generations deep inside the cool soil of the Pine Tree State, … Read more

Changing Maine and the necessity of PoC spaces

By LaLa Drew | September 21, 2017 | 0 Comments

Today’s post comes from LaLa Drew, who is a queer poet and activist located in Portland, Maine. They organize a recurring poetry night for queer and femme POC. You can also find their work online. ———————————————————————- To be a person of color in Maine is to eat sleep and breathe Whiteness. Despite the melanin of … Read more

Navigating racism, or Hate exists everywhere whether you admit it or not

By blackgirlinmaine | September 19, 2017 | 0 Comments

Growing up in the 1970s and 1980s in Chicago, there were neighborhoods and nearby suburbs that I knew, as a Black person, we were never to enter. Bridgeport, Marquette Park, Mount Greenwood and Cicero for starters. These were areas where being caught in them as a Black person could mean your life. In 1966, Martin … Read more

Your new Black friend explains racism

By Samuel James | September 15, 2017 | 5 Comments

Today’s post comes by way of Samuel James, one of our newest contributors (though not new to writing for publication). He is, however, better known to most people as a roots musician. He wields a voice of grit and gravel and is a modern guitar master; his songwriting has been compared to Leonard Cohen’s and … Read more

Calling all white people, part 20: Appropriation is NOT appreciation

By Average White Guy | September 13, 2017 | 0 Comments

Calling All White People, Part 20 (A periodic attempt to mobilize white people for something other than supporting just other melanin-deficient folks and maintaining a status quo of a nation geared toward whiteness as the baseline and the norm) By An Average White Guy TODAY’S EPISODE: Cultural appropriation isn’t some “little” issue and it’s not … Read more

#MeToo: The erasure and fetishization of the Black body

By LaLa Drew | October 17, 2017 | 0 Comments

Sunday morning when I logged online, a fluttering ping of status updates rolled into a steady flow of trauma to my feed. Ping “Me too.” Ping “Me too.” Ping “Me too.” Often accompanied with the words: “If all the women who have been sexually harassed and/or sexually assaulted wrote ‘Me too.’ as their status, we might give people a sense of the magnitude of the problem.” Reading these posts, I was affected and moved. Though not moved enough share, despite my long history with sexual trauma. I confess, when I looked at the updates, they felt like another thing which wasn’t meant for me, like pussy hats or the right to breathe. Each survivor posting was white, mostly cis-het, and comfortably using the term “woman” to describe who the posts were for. It wasn’t until later in the evening that I spotted a Black femme on my feed had posted, “Me too.” I scrolled, another Black femme, and another, and another. As I scrolled more and more friend’s posts popped up. Black, queer, nonbinary, femme,...

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#MeToo: The erasure and fetishization of the Black body

By LaLa Drew | October 17, 2017 | 0 Comments

Sunday morning when I logged online, a fluttering ping of status updates rolled into a steady flow of trauma to my feed. Ping “Me too.” Ping “Me too.” Ping “Me too.” Often accompanied with the words: “If all the women who have been sexually harassed and/or sexually assaulted wrote ‘Me too.’ as their status, we … Read more

I am tired, or The trauma of white supremacy

By blackgirlinmaine | September 6, 2017

I don’t know about you but I am tired. Like deep in my bones, weary and wondering when will it end? The past few years have brought us a nonstop flow of Black pain and suffering as we have seen Black kids, teens and adults whose lives have been taken too soon by a system … Read more

The soul of the nation

By Teddy Burrage | August 17, 2017

Today’s post is written by regular BGIM contributor Teddy Burrage, a Portland, Maine, native and local activist and organizer. When he’s not writing or working, you can usually find him exploring Maine’s vast interior and coastline. ———————————————————————– The events that took place in Charlottesville and the days after laid bare the soul of the United … Read more

Calling all white people, part 19: Chuck white feelings in the wake of Charlottesville

By Average White Guy | August 13, 2017

Calling All White People, Part 19 (A periodic attempt to mobilize white people for something other than supporting just other melanin-deficient folks and maintaining a status quo of a nation geared toward whiteness as the baseline and the norm) By An Average White Guy TODAY’S EPISODE: Get real about what Charlottesville means, and get out … Read more

Radical tenderness

By Veronica Perez | September 28, 2017

Today’s post is from contributor Veronica A. Perez (b. 1983). She is an artist and educator who works mostly in the mediums of sculpture and photography. Usually utilizing construction and kitschy materials in her pieces, Perez creates intense personal moments by means of hybridization, ideals of beauty, nostalgia, while fragility echoes sentiments of a lost … Read more

We are not the problem

By Samara Cole Doyon | September 25, 2017

Today’s post is written by Samara Doyon. Samara has been a Black girl living in Maine for the past 30+ years (read: her entire life). She is a writer, educator, wife, and mother. Despite the roots of her family tree, half of which reach generations deep inside the cool soil of the Pine Tree State, … Read more

Changing Maine and the necessity of PoC spaces

By LaLa Drew | September 21, 2017

Today’s post comes from LaLa Drew, who is a queer poet and activist located in Portland, Maine. They organize a recurring poetry night for queer and femme POC. You can also find their work online. ———————————————————————- To be a person of color in Maine is to eat sleep and breathe Whiteness. Despite the melanin of … Read more

Changing Maine and the necessity of PoC spaces

By LaLa Drew | September 21, 2017

Today’s post comes from LaLa Drew, who is a queer poet and activist located in Portland, Maine. They organize a recurring poetry night for queer and femme POC. You can also find their work online. ———————————————————————- To be a person of color in Maine is to eat sleep and breathe Whiteness. Despite the melanin of … Read more

Navigating racism, or Hate exists everywhere whether you admit it or not

By blackgirlinmaine | September 19, 2017

Growing up in the 1970s and 1980s in Chicago, there were neighborhoods and nearby suburbs that I knew, as a Black person, we were never to enter. Bridgeport, Marquette Park, Mount Greenwood and Cicero for starters. These were areas where being caught in them as a Black person could mean your life. In 1966, Martin … Read more

On being the Black friend

By Guest Poster | August 22, 2017

Today’s post is written by special contributor “Aya,” a Black Millennial making her way in Maine’s most populous city.  Even before moving to Maine, I’ve spent most of my life in primarily white spaces. I’ve learned to accept that if I want to be surrounded by people who look like me, I have to deliberately … Read more

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